decry


decry
decry, depreciate, disparage, derogate, detract, belittle, minimize mean to write, speak, or otherwise indicate one's feeling in regard to something in such a way as to reveal one's low opinion of it.
Decry implies open or public condemnation or censure with the intent to discredit or run down someone or something
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there seems almost a general wish of decrying the capacity and undervaluing the labor of the novelist— Austen

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you've had a Western education . . . but you're decrying everything Western science has contributed to the world— Heiser

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Depreciate implies a representation of a person or thing as of smaller worth than that usually ascribed to it
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to prove that the Americans ought not to be free, we are obliged to depreciate the value of freedom itself— Burke

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he seems to me to depreciate Shakespeare for the wrong reasons— T. S. Eliot

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shocked to learn that professional art critics today depreciate his works— Mary McCarthy

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Disparage implies depreciation by more subtle or indirect methods (as slighting, invidious reference, or faint praise)
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the critic ... is generally disparaged as an artist who has failed— L. P. Smith

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cities . . . which they sometimes pretended to disparage, but of which they were secretly and inordinately proud— Repplier

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Derogate and detract (both with from) stress the idea of taking away, positively and injuriously, especially from reputation or merit; derogate from may be used with an impersonal subject only, detract from with either a personal or an impersonal subject
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a few instances of inaccuracy or mediocrity can never derogate from the superlative merit of Homer and Vergil— Goldsmith

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far am I from detracting from the merit of some gentlemen ... on that occasion— Burke

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the advocates of pure poetry are apt to take the line that any admixture of logical, of "prose" meaning detracts from the value of a poem— Day Lewis

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Belittle and minimize both imply depreciation, but belittle suggests an effort to make a thing contemptibly small, and minimize to reduce it to a minimum or to make it seem either disparagingly or defensively as small as possible
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he was inclined to belittle the assistance he had received from others

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he minimized the dangers of the task

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let there be no belittling of such qualities as Archer's—his coherent thinking, his sense of the worth of order and workmanship— Montague

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al- ways delighted at a pretext for belittling a distinguished contemporary— Edmund Wilson

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"Don't think that I am trying to minimize your excellent work among the hop pickers this year," he told his curate— Mackenzie

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Analogous words: *disapprove, deprecate: *criticize, denounce, reprehend, censure, reprobate, condemn
Antonyms: extol
Contrasted words: acclaim, laud, eulogize, *praise: *exalt, magnify

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Decry — De*cry , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Decried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Decrying}.] [F. d[ e]crier, OF. descrier; pref. des (L. dis ) + crier to cry. See {Cry}, and cf. {Descry}.] To cry down; to censure as faulty, mean, or worthless; to clamor against; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • decry — decry, descry are related in origin but now have widely different meanings. To decry something is to disparage or deplore it • (She decries the spread of tower blocks and the failure to turn derelict sites into green spaces Evening Standard,… …   Modern English usage

  • decry — [dē krī′] vt. decried, decrying [Fr décrier < OFr descrier: see DE & CRY] 1. to speak out against strongly and openly; denounce [to decry religious intolerance] 2. to depreciate (money, etc.) officially SYN. DISPARAGE decrial …   English World dictionary

  • decry — I verb admonish, be unable to respect, belittle, berate, bring discredit on, bring into disrepute, censure, censure as faulty, clamor against, condemn, condemn as worthless, contemn, criticize, cry down, cry out against, declaim against, degrade …   Law dictionary

  • decry — 1610s, from Fr. decrier (14c.; O.Fr. descrier cry out, announce ), from de down, out (see DE (Cf. de )) + crier to cry. In English, the sense has been colored by the presumption that de in this word means down …   Etymology dictionary

  • decry — [v] criticize, blame abuse, asperse, badmouth*, belittle, calumniate, censure, condemn, cry down, defame, denounce, depreciate, derogate, detract, devalue, diminish, discount, discredit, disgrace, disparage, do a number on*, downgrade, dump on*,… …   New thesaurus

  • decry — ► VERB (decries, decried) ▪ publicly denounce. DERIVATIVES decrier noun. ORIGIN originally in the sense «decrease the value of coins by royal proclamation»: from French décrier cry down …   English terms dictionary

  • decry — transitive verb Etymology: French décrier, from Old French decrier, from de + crier to cry Date: 1614 1. to depreciate (as a coin) officially or publicly 2. to express strong disapproval of < decry the …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • decry — decrier, n. /di kruy /, v.t., decried, decrying. 1. to speak disparagingly of; denounce as faulty or worthless; express censure of: She decried the lack of support for the arts in this country. 2. to condemn or depreciate by proclamation, as… …   Universalium

  • decry — de•cry [[t]dɪˈkraɪ[/t]] v. t. cried, cry•ing 1) to disparage openly 2) to depreciate by proclamation, as coins • Etymology: 1610–20; < F décrier, de•cri′al, n. de•cri′er, n. syn: decry, denigrate, deprecate involve the expression of censure or …   From formal English to slang


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